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  • katejackson7

Intern’s Graduation

Updated: Jan 6

Who better to train a young man in his profession than his father?


Let me introduce you to a writer I respect regarding the dignity of family roots in a trade or profession:


Let's take the example of Maître Pignon, "Master Pignon. He was from a family of French lumberjacks or woodcutters whose lineage ran from the time of the Romans. That family continued cutting trees for centuries until the period of the French Revolution.


Every year at the birthday of the head of the family, the King would send a small chivalry unit to deliver a handwritten letter congratulating the particular Maître Pignon of his time. All the heads of that family became Maître Pignon. He was called Master because the long history of competence in that profession made him capable of teaching successive generations the fine points and family secrets of the work.


In one of these letters, written by Louis XIV if I am not mistaken, the King offered him the title of Baron. The Maître Pignon of that time thanked the King very much, but declined the offer because, he declared, he preferred to be the oldest woodcutter of France than its newest baron.


We know that a woodcutter is much less than a baron, but we see that this long history of woodcutting confers something imponderable to a family, giving it a singular specialization, ability and know-how that makes it the best that exists in that work."


This story conveys something of pride this family company has in it's intern and son. Tomôs graduated with a BSc honours in Digital Media Development in 3D Environments (Game & Heritage) on October 18th the feast of St Luke. Deo Gratias!



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